Hi! I'm Fernanda, a character animator and illustrator from Santiago, Chile and this is my blog! I graduated from the 3D Character Animation program at Animation Mentor, but I specialize in 2D as well (Actually I love it the most!). I also love making comics and hope to finish my graphic novel one day. Here you will find updates about my projects, sketches and animation stuff in general.
Install Theme

drawnblog:

The first episode of Ze Frank’s new show is a battle cry for creativity and making things.

Un pequeño discurso que apela a la creatividad y el hacer cosas.

(Source: youtube.com)

If you look at the movies that Brad has directed -if you look at “The Iron Giant”, if you look at “The Incredibles” and “Ratatouille”- they’re about the choices you need to make for your dream. And Brad’s message is always, stick to your guns. It’s going to be hard, it’s going to be challenging, but stick to your guns, believe in yourself, and do what you need to do to be happy.

Mark Andrews, refering to Brad Bird in the Ratatouille artbook.

It’s like you run into this dark tunnel, trusting that somewhere there’s another end to it where you’re going to come out. And there’s a point in the middle where it’s just dark. There’s no light from where you came from and there’s no light from the other end; all you can do is keep running. And then you start to see a little light, and a little more light, and then, bam! You’re out in the sun.

— Pete Docter (To Infinity and Beyond: The story of Pixar Animation Studios)

austinkleon:

drawnblog:

(via Super Obvious Secrets That I Wish They’d Teach In Art School at Marvelous Mustache Factory)
Phil McAndrew offers up solid advice for young cartoonists and illustrators. From my own experience, every word is true, but especially this:
I’ve tried many different methods of self promotion. I’ve sent out postcards in the mail, I’ve tried shmoozing at conventions, I’ve sent cold emails and have considered cold calling art directors (I’m still considering it). The most effective thing I’ve done has actually been the simplest: Draw awesome stuff and put it on the internet. Do this for a while and good things will happen.

Yep.

austinkleon:

drawnblog:

(via Super Obvious Secrets That I Wish They’d Teach In Art School at Marvelous Mustache Factory)

Phil McAndrew offers up solid advice for young cartoonists and illustrators. From my own experience, every word is true, but especially this:

I’ve tried many different methods of self promotion. I’ve sent out postcards in the mail, I’ve tried shmoozing at conventions, I’ve sent cold emails and have considered cold calling art directors (I’m still considering it). The most effective thing I’ve done has actually been the simplest: Draw awesome stuff and put it on the internet. Do this for a while and good things will happen.

Yep.

Secrets of the Self Employed (or How to be an Amazing [insert profession here]) →

15 inspirational secrets from the illustrator Keri Smith.

10. Worrying about the competition does very little to help your career. I know it’s hard sometimes to ignore what other people are doing (we all think that others are doing better than us), but every one of us is on a different life path. We are all here to accomplish different things and even though it would seem like one person’s path is similar to yours, it is not.

lisahanawalt:

I made this list for myself a year ago when I was feeling  frustrated and unmotivated (that first East Coast Winter is a doozy) and  taped it to my studio wall. Yesterday it ended up on Boing Boing!
I find it very helpful to make up rules for myself, even if I end up ignoring half of them (I haven’t really turned the internet off since 1998). No list can be one size fits all, so here’s my one bit of prescriptive advice: Make your own list, custom-tailored to what you do and how you work!
And as for other things like this on the internet (there are lots), I highly, highly recommend:
- Frank Chimero’s Advice for Graphic Design Students
- Keri Smith’s “Secrets Shared”
- Austin Kleon’s “How to Steal Like an Artist”

lisahanawalt:

I made this list for myself a year ago when I was feeling frustrated and unmotivated (that first East Coast Winter is a doozy) and taped it to my studio wall. Yesterday it ended up on Boing Boing!

I find it very helpful to make up rules for myself, even if I end up ignoring half of them (I haven’t really turned the internet off since 1998). No list can be one size fits all, so here’s my one bit of prescriptive advice: Make your own list, custom-tailored to what you do and how you work!

And as for other things like this on the internet (there are lots), I highly, highly recommend:

- Frank Chimero’s Advice for Graphic Design Students

- Keri Smith’s “Secrets Shared”

- Austin Kleon’s “How to Steal Like an Artist”

Start copying [what] you love. Copy copy copy copy. At the end of [the] copy you will find your self.

— Designer Yohji Yamamoto’s advice to young people (via austinkleon)

(via austinkleon)

kolbisneat:

I’m a couple days behind posting this, but with the weekend being what it was, I suppose better Monday than never. Anyways, Jerrod and the fine folks at The Pixar Times approached me to contribute to their regular Pixart feature. Best. Offer. Ever!
Picking a single film to be inspired by is nigh impossible. It’s like picking the best chip in a chocolate chip cookie! Instead I offer you this: Geri’s Pet Store featuring something from every film or unique short (ones not based on a main feature) up until Spring 2011.
Happy viewing! Oh and be sure to check the other subs right here.

I had to reblog this, it’s so awesome @_@ I wish it would be available as a poster

kolbisneat:

I’m a couple days behind posting this, but with the weekend being what it was, I suppose better Monday than never. Anyways, Jerrod and the fine folks at The Pixar Times approached me to contribute to their regular Pixart feature. Best. Offer. Ever!

Picking a single film to be inspired by is nigh impossible. It’s like picking the best chip in a chocolate chip cookie! Instead I offer you this: Geri’s Pet Store featuring something from every film or unique short (ones not based on a main feature) up until Spring 2011.

Happy viewing! Oh and be sure to check the other subs right here.

I had to reblog this, it’s so awesome @_@ I wish it would be available as a poster

That is, you see a picture of Jackson Pollock smoking a cigarette and looking intense and you think “smoking and being super intense are part of what made Jackson Pollock the artist he was”. And then, worst of all, “if I were to start smoking and being all intense then I would increase my ability to create great art”. And worse again if we begin with “Jackson Pollock was an alcoholic and frequently an awful person to be around”, so…

— Pippin Barr, The Meta-Aesthetics of Artists: how emulating the habits of successful artists is not the key to making art. (via drawnblog)

(via drawnblog)

Animacion: “I’m a Monster” por Headless Studios.

Asi quiero llegar a animar algun dia <3

linkhare:

Oye Juaco, mira.

Ojala hubiera visto este video hace un par de años, no dibujaba NADA por miedo a que quedara mal. Muchas croqueras vacias de esa epoca. Cuando deje de preocuparme y me decidi a solo rayar, lo empece a pasar bien dibujando otra vez y de paso creo que empece a mejorar.

We are all beautiful people but also strange in some ways. We all have psychological quirks that whisk us though life, along many paths that often are not really of our own choosing. Why did we choose art for a career - certainly not because we were good at it. If we were good at it we wouldn’t have to struggle so hard to make a go of it. But we plug along, each at out own pace, some eager and industrious in improving ourselves - some of us sit back and wait for the “light” to come on. Some of us are driven by some invisible urge to create. Others need some project imposed on us from outside to stir us into action.
Animation has a unique requirement in that it’s rewards are vaguely rewarding and at the same time frustrating. We are performers but our audience is hidden from us. We are actors but there is no appaluse. We are artists but our works are not framed and hung on walls for friends to see. We are sensitive people whose sensibility is judged across the world in dingy theaters by sometimes popcorn eating audience. Yet we are called upon day by day to delve deep into our psyche and come up with fresh creative bits of entertaining fare. That requires a special kind of discipline and devotion, and entushiasm. Our inner dialog must be amply peppered with encouraging argument. We sometimes have to invent or create an audience in our mind to draw for. Our fellow artists only partially serve us in that respect. We go to them for critisism not for praise. The directors are necessarily merciless. We at times almost connive rather than create to get a scene by them. I used to sing in operettas, concerts, etc., so I know what real applause is. It is heavenly. A living audience draws something extra out of the performer. A stage director once said to the cast of a playon the opening night:

"You’ve had good equipment to work with, a theater with everything it takes to put on a show but you have been handicapped - one essential thing has been denied to you. Tonight there is an audience out there, now you have everything you need."

Well, we do have an audience out there. We’ll be denied the applause but at least there is a potential audience to perform for; for one to keep in mind constanstly as we shape up day by day our year dress rehearsal. Even as we struggle with the myriad difficulties of finalizing a picture, we can perform each act for that invinsible or mystical audience. We can’t see our audience, but it is real and it is something to work for.
So all you beautiful people, if you are the kind that needs a little mental manipulation to keep your creative juices flowing, perhaps this has been of some benefit; if not, well, so be it.

— Ch. 50 “A bit of Introspection” by Walt Stanchfield in Drawn to life Vol.1

People sometimes sneer at those who run every day, claiming they’ll go to any length to live longer. But don’t think that’s the reason most people run. Most runners run not because they want to live longer, but because they want to live life to the fullest. If you’re going to while away the years, it’s far better to live them with clear goals and fully alive then in a fog, and I believe running helps you to do that. Exerting yourself to the fullest within your individual limits: that’s the essence of running, and a metaphor for life — and for me, for writing as whole. I believe many runners would agree.
Don’t be afraid to make a mistake. We all have 10.000 bad drawings in us so the sooner you get them out the better!

— Walt Stanchfield